Bee Changes

The following original publications are available at www.apidologie.org:

Szabo, T.I. and Lefkovitch, L.P. 1988. Fourth generation of closed population honeybee breeding. 2. Relationship between morphological and colony traits. Apidologie 19(3): 259-274. [article]

Szabo, T.I. and Lefkovitch, L.P. 1989. Effect of brood production and population size on honey production of honeybee colonies in Alberta, Canada. Apidologie 20(2): 157-163. [article]

Szabo, T.I. 1990 Morphometric characteristics of Apis cerana from Sri Lanka. Apidologie 21(6): 505-509. [abstract] [article]

Szabo, T.I. and L.P. Lefkovitch. 1992. Heritability of colour patterns in a closed population of honey bees. Apidologie 23: 151-159. [abstract] [article]

Bee Venerable

“Man’s relationship with honeybees is as ancient as man himself.”

I discovered many sites while investigating beekeeping in ancient times and want to share a couple of them.

Honey bees in art date back to the Paleolithic era. You can see a Paleolithic cave painting on mdbee.com.

“When the Sun weeps a second time, and lets fall water from his eyes, it is changed into working bees; they work in the flowers of each kind, and honey and wax are produced instead of water.”

- From first millennium BCE text by S. Birch, Egyptian Magical Text, in S. Birch ed., Records of the Past, Vol.6, 1876, pSalt 825,
  Source: http://www.reshafim.org.il/ad/egypt/timelines/topics/beekeeping.htm